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LGBTQIA+ Books

Since I was feeling a little beat up about season 7 of Voltron, I decided to compile a list of books that have characters that are LGBTQIA+. Enjoy!

Representation is a big deal in the modern age. While some of these books might not necessarily be considered “modern” and a few others might not be conventionally LGBTQIA+, they all DO have representation of one form or another. In an age where people are becoming more accepting, it is imperative to introduce diverse characters to our younger generations and even older generations to show them that there is absolutely nothing wrong with accepting who you are and how to accept the people around you. In recent years, I have seen this improve tremendously and can’t wait to see how this improves even more in the future of print media, TV, and movies.

If there’s a book you love that isn’t listed below, or if you’re an author with LGBTQIA+ rep in your book, feel free to drop the title/link to your book down in the comments. I tried to keep this list to ones that I had read, but I slipped in a few that I haven’t gotten around to.

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1. Carry On by Rainbow Rowell

2. Captive Prince by P.S. Pacat

3. Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller

3.5 The Iliad by Homer

4. Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green and David Levithan

5. Of Fire and Stars by Audrey Coulthurst

6. The Raven Cycle (series) by Maggie Stiefvater

120000207. Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

8. Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard (series) by Rick Riordan

9. Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

10. The Mortal Instruments (series) by Cassandra Clare

11. Let’s Talk About Love by Claire Kann

12. Contagion by Erin Bowman

13. None of the Above by I.W. Gregorio

14. Mask of Shadows by Linsey Miller

15. Been Here All Along by Sandy Hall

16. Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde

17. At the Edge of the Universe by Shaun David Hutchinson

18. Fence (graphic novel series) by P.S. Pacat

19. Every Day (series) by David Levithan

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With Malice by Eileen Cook (ARC) – Review

Title: With Malice
Author: Eileen Cook
Format: Paperback (ARC)
Pages: 320
Rating 5/5

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**I received a copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review**

When Jill Charron wakes up in the hospital with no recollection of the past six weeks, her life is in ruins. The accident that put her in the hospital also killed her best friend, Simone. The worst part? Jill was the one driving and everyone seems to think that the accident wasn’t really an accident. Soon, Jill finds herself facing reporters and the harsh people on the internet that all seem to have one thing in common. Everyone thinks that Jill killed Simone. If only Jill knew what really happened. Was Simone’s death really an accident?

First thought after finishing With Malice? “Oh. My. Gosh.”

Pulling you in from page one, With Malice shows not only the struggles of Jill and how she has to deal with foreign police, her own injuries, and a blog that’s basically dedicated to trying to prove her guilty, but also the side of crime that I think many books leave out. About half of the book is dedicated to the reports given by the police, friends of Jill and Simone, random locals that witnesses the accident, and people they met along the way while in Italy. Giving these point of views really helps bring out how words and events can be twisted around. From people wanting the spotlight to honest misreading of the scenario, With Malice has it all.

Let’s talk characters.

Victim or not, I didn’t like Simone from the start. She seemed like the kind of person to trip someone in the hallway just so she could have a laugh or the kind of person to get someone else in trouble for something she did, because it would suit her better to play innocent all the time. Her character just sat wrong with me from cover to cover and I stick to that.

I felt bad for Jill, but I almost felt bad for feeling bad. Dealing with memory loss has to be awful, but when put in a situation where everyone’s asking “What happened?!” it certainly has to be worse. Especially since everyone thinks she was the one to blame for the accident, most people probably thought she was pulling the memory loss card just so she doesn’t have to tell her side. I think that’s awful. But with the lingering “Was is really an accident?” question floating around, I didn’t want to feel bad for her just in case she was to blame.

Nico. I didn’t trust him. No good looking foreign smart guy has good motives. Not to mention he’s obviously a flirt. And the very thought of committing murder-suicide for the likes of him (or any guy in general) should be unthinkable, but in this day and age, there’s just no way to know for sure.

I picked up With Malice with the promise of a fast paced, electrifying story that I wouldn’t be able to put down and I’m glad to say that I wasn’t disappointed in the slightest. Cook knows exactly what the reader wants, mixing in mystery, violence, friendship, and romance in a way that’s just right for the story. With Malice keeps you guessing from the very start, causing you to try and make connections with outlandish theories and assumptions that keep you hooked from start to finish and leave you wanting more.

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I Let You Go by Clare Mackintosh (ARC) – Review

Title: I Let You Go
Author: Clare Mackintosh
Format: Paperback (ARC)
Pages: 369
Rating: 4/5

26026062Goodreads Excerpt:
I Let You Go follows Jenna Gray as she moves to a ramshackle cottage on the remote Welsh coast, trying to escape the memory of the car accident that plays again and again in her mind and desperate to heal from the loss of her child and the rest of her painful past. At the same time, the novel tracks the pair of Bristol police investigators trying to get to the bottom of this hit-and-run. As they chase down one hopeless lead after another, they find themselves as drawn to each other as they are to the frustrating, twist-filled case before them.

There’s not a lot I can say about I Let You Go without giving away half of the plot. What I can say is that this is the first suspense/thriller book I’ve read that actually gave me that thrilling feeling, like the plot kept building and building until I finished the book. At first I thought this would be a standard mystery book. The whole “Who Did It?” kind of thing where you take the pieces and put them together within the first one hundred pages. However, around the 100 mark, I realized just how wrong I was. I Let You Go is a terribly heartbreaking novel that fixates on loss and pain, but in a way that constantly throws your guesses in the wrong direction. This book shows more than one side of the story, breaking it up into three major viewpoints. The viewpoint of Jenna (the main character), the police force, and closer to the middle of the book a special someone that I can’t talk about without spoiling. I Let You Go is the perfect tragedy novel with a little something that sucks everyone in at some point. The constant twists and turns keep you guessing and once the story picks up, it’s hard to put it down.